Tag Archives: Conservation

52nd Featured Thinker: Dave Foreman

This week’s Featured Thinker is Dave Foreman, writer, conservationist and activist and we are excited to present Dave’s passionate writing on Wilderness and the Anthropocene as our closing feature in LEAP’s year-long meditation on Wilderness.  It seems appropriate to end this phase of the project with a thinker who has been an advocate of wilderness and wildlands conservationist for more than forty years. He is currently the Executive Director and Senior Fellow of The Rewilding Institute, a conservation “think tank” advancing ideas of continental conservation.

In the Anthropocene and Ozymandias, Dave writes,  Much has been made lately of the so-called Anthropocene—the idea that Homo sapiens has so taken over and modified Earth that we need a new name for our geological age instead of the outmoded Holocene. One remorseless Anthropoceniac writes, “Nature is gone…   Read more….

50th Featured Thinker: Neera Singh

Participatory visual ethnography in Odisha. Image: Nihar Mishra

Participatory visual ethnography in Odisha. Image: Nihar Mishra

This week’s Featured Thinker, is Neera Singh, Assistant Professor of Geography within the Dept. of Geography and Planning, at the University of Toronto. Neera’s long-term engagement as an activist informs her research and pedagogical approach, raising questions  around human-forest interactions  and theoretical approaches to study these interactions. The featured article frames villagers’ caring work to conserve forests as “affective labour” and a work of art – transforming not only landscapes, but also people and communities. Neera’s work focuses on the much-neglected emotional and affective dimensions of people’s relationship with nature.

She has experimented with using participatory videos how people “become green” through their every day practices of taking care of their local forests. Neera’s research spotlights the potential for seeing conservation and conservation work as not only a burden but a life-affirming activity that can help us re-learn how to care for other species and other humans. Read more….